Archbishop Orombi: What Is Anglicanism?

From here:

With this knowledge of the centrality of the authority of Scripture in Anglicanism, therefore, we understand ourselves to be in the mainstream of Anglicanism—from Thomas Cranmer to John Stott. The evangelical tradition in the Church of England produced William Wilberforce, whose lifelong mission to eradicate slavery and the slave trade liberated our people. It produced Charles Simeon, who inspired the beginning of mission societies that shared the gospel of Jesus Christ with us and many others. It produced Bishop Tucker and other missionaries, who risked their lives to come to Uganda. These and many more Anglican evangelicals brought us the legacy of the Protestant Reformation in England. Their commitment to salvation through faith in Jesus Christ as revealed in Scripture has continued among us to this day.

Such a commitment—to the authority of Scripture as a defining mark of Anglican identity—was why the vast majority of bishops from the Global South and I insisted that Lambeth Resolution 1.10, the 1998 decision on human sexuality, include the words “incompatible with Holy Scripture” when describing homosexual practice. This standard of Holy Scripture is why we continue to uphold Lambeth 1.10 each time we meet.

In the current Anglican crisis, we are at risk of losing our biblical foundation. As bishops, we are constrained, in the words of the 1662 Ordinal, “to banish and drive away from the Church all erroneous and strange doctrine contrary to God’s Word,” and we are determined “out of the same Holy Scriptures to instruct the people committed to [our] charge and to teach or maintain nothing, as necessary to eternal salvation, but that which [we] shall be persuaded may be concluded and proved by the same.”

From Thomas Cranmer to Richard Hooker, from the Thirty-Nine Articles and the 1662 Ordinal to the 1998 Lambeth Conference, the authority of Holy Scripture has always held a central and foundational role in Anglican identity. This is true for the Anglican church in Uganda; and, if it is not true for the entire Anglican Communion, then that communion will cease to be an authentic expression of the Church of Jesus Christ.

The Archbishop goes on to say this about the Lambeth conference:

In December 2006, the House of Bishops of the Church of Uganda unanimously adopted “The Road to Lambeth,” a statement drafted for a council of African provinces. Among other things, it stated, “We will definitely not attend any Lambeth Conference to which the violators of the Lambeth Resolution [1.10] are also invited as participants or observers.” Accordingly, if the present invitations to the Lambeth Conference stand, I do not expect the Ugandan bishops to attend.

It is important that this decision not be misunderstood as withdrawing from the instruments of communion. On the contrary, our decision reflects the critical importance of the Lambeth Conference: Its value as an instrument of communion is greatly diminished when the persistent violators of its resolutions are invited. If our resolutions as a council of bishops do not have moral authority among ourselves, how can we expect our statements on world affairs to carry weight in the world’s forums? An instrument of communion must also be an instrument of discipline in order to effectively facilitate meaningful communion among its autonomous provinces.

The Church of Uganda takes its Anglican identity and the future prospects of the global Anglican Communion very seriously. Our thoughtfulness in how we participate in the instruments of communion reflects our fundamental loyalty to our Anglican heritage. Likewise, our devotion to the Word of God—expressed through our martyrs, revival, and the historic episcopate—reflects our commitment to the ongoing place of the Church of Uganda as a province of the Anglican Communion.

Reading this brings to the fore of my mind once again the fact that many Anglican provinces have a much stronger view of Anglicanism that those in the West. For bishops like Orombi, Akinola (who head the Church of Nigeria-ANGLICAN COMMUNION), and others, Anglican is their identity, and what we do in the West affects them whether we like it or not. I truly wish the leadership of TEC would take Anglicanism more seriously rather than cavalierly.

2 Responses to “Archbishop Orombi: What Is Anglicanism?”


  1. 1 Jan July 13, 2007 at 4:24 am

    Mark Harris at Preludium posted on Bishop Orombi’s address in a quite dishonest fashion by interpolating a quote from another source. I tried to post a response to this and it was denied. Given his position and power in the TEC hierarchy, his intergeting a quote to make the Bishop’s address to appear to be an attack on homosexuality is not just dishonest but clearly incendiary.

    So I am copying here my response which was denied on his comment site.

    I would like to point out that this quote:

    “People have abandoned relationships with the opposite sex. One wonders whether God was stupid to create Eve for Adam. Why isn’t Eve beautiful any more? Eve is going out with Eve and Adam with Adam,” Archbishop Orombi lamented.

    Archbishop Orombi, also the Bishop of Kampala, decried the rise of homosexual activity in Uganda to the point where homosexuals have begun to demand special constitutional rights. Orombi cautioned audiences that just as God punished the biblical cities of Sodom and Gomorrah – destroyed by fire and brimstone for the sexual immorality of its inhabitants – he would not let this sin go unpunished either.”

    Which Mark Harris interjects and proceeds to comment upon, as though it is from Bishop Orombi’s “What is Anglicanism,” was googled from a uncreditable extreme blog called LifeSite.

    Why one wonders did Mark Harris search so far afield for that quote?

    Well quite likely because Bishop Orombi does not speak at all about sexual issues in his “What is Anglicanism.”

    For some reason Mark Harris needs to accuse the Bishop on this issue and rightly assuming that most of his readers will not have taken time to read the original, felt free to imply that this quote was part of the Bishop’s address. But it was not and his implication is a lie.

    Mark Harris is on the Executive Committee of TEC and recently appointed to the sub-committee on TEC’s response to the proposed Covenant. One hopes that he will bring more honesty, less manipulation to that process than he’s shown in this recent post. The internet has changed the world.

    Mark Harris at Preludium posted on this and deliberately misrepresented the intention of the Bishop’s address, by interjecting the issue of homosexuality which was not in the Bishop’s letter.
    I attempted to question him on this by posting a comment but my response was not allowed.
    I wouls like to post it here because I think that as powerful as Mark Harris is in TEC, he should be accountable.
    hank you if you will post this. Or comment if not posting.

    I would like to point out that this quote:

    “People have abandoned relationships with the opposite sex. One wonders whether God was stupid to create Eve for Adam. Why isn’t Eve beautiful any more? Eve is going out with Eve and Adam with Adam,” Archbishop Orombi lamented.

    Archbishop Orombi, also the Bishop of Kampala, decried the rise of homosexual activity in Uganda to the point where homosexuals have begun to demand special constitutional rights. Orombi cautioned audiences that just as God punished the biblical cities of Sodom and Gomorrah – destroyed by fire and brimstone for the sexual immorality of its inhabitants – he would not let this sin go unpunished either.”

    Which Mark Harris interjects and proceeds to comment upon, as though it is from Bishop Orombi’s “What is Anglicanism,” was googled from a uncreditable extreme blog called LifeSite.

    Why one wonders did Mark Harris search so far afield for that quote?

    Well quite likely because Bishop Orombi does not speak at all about sexual issues in his “What is Anglicanism.”

    For some reason Mark Harris needs to accuse the Bishop on this issue and rightly assuming that most of his readers will not have taken time to read the original, felt free to imply that this quote was part of the Bishop’s address. But it was not and his implication is a lie.

    Mark Harris is on the Executive Committee of TEC and recently appointed to the sub-committee on TEC’s response to the proposed Covenant. One hopes that he will bring more honesty, less manipulation to that process than he’s shown in this recent post. The internet has changed the world.

  2. 2 Jan July 13, 2007 at 4:26 am

    sorry for the doublepost


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